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Rotisserie Baskets

Try out some advanced Rotisserie Cooking Techniques

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So you've discovered the advantages of rotisserie chicken or rotisserie roasts. Now imagine doing the same for chicken wings, whole fish, or cut vegetables. With an accessory or two for your rotisserie equipment there isn't much you can not spin over a fire. The self basting, even cooking advantages of rotisserie cooking will have you spinning almost anything you can grill.

What you need is a rotisserie basket. These accessories add a whole new level of functionality to your rotisserie spit. These units hold foods a normal rotisserie rod simply can't. There are two basic kinds of rotisserie baskets, the tumble basket and the flat basket (sometimes called a fish basket). These attach to your rotisserie rod and work pretty much like anything you would put on a rotisserie.

The tumble basket is a round basket with a door. You can put in any small food item, like chicken wings or cut vegetables. The food pieces simply tumble around inside the basket as it turns over the fire. Of course, you will want to make sure that whatever you do put in a grill basket will hold together under the constant rolling around.

The tumble basket is a round basket with a door. You can put in any small food item, like chicken wings or cut vegetables. The food pieces simply tumble around inside the basket as it turns over the fire. You will want to make sure that whatever you do put in a grill basket will hold together under the constant rolling around.

The flat basket is two attached grates that allow you to sandwich foods in between them. These are ideal for larger, flatter foods like whole fish. Foods are held secure while they turn over the fire. The biggest problem with these is that foods on the outside pass closer to the flame than foods towards the rod.

Like with any rotisserie cooking you want to place a drip pan under any food that will drip grease. Flare-ups can burn foods quickly, especially if those foods are small items. You should also try to avoid having direct heat under the food. Try to set your grill to heat around the food, not under it. This provides for more even heating and better slow roasting.

The one thing you need to really watch out for is drying. Smaller food items, tumbling around or already pretty lean can dry out on your rotisserie. A quick tip for basting small items is to put together a thin, watery mixture like a marinade that you can spray with a spray bottle. This means no chunks of spices or herbs. Maybe a garlic infused oil with a little water to thin it out. It doesn't have to be fancy, just wet. Spray it lightly over foods on your rotisserie occasionally during the cooking process to help prevent drying.

As for cooking times? Since you are grilling farther from the flame, and hopefully indirectly plan on doubling the cooking times of any recipe. This of course is dependent on how you have your rotisserie set up, the amount of wind that day, the type of grill you are using and how you have the fire set. You might need to play it a little by ear, but I'm sure you will get the hang of it quickly and have a great time preparing rotisserie chicken wings, or whatever you can dream up.

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